Your child’s health, the Gut and SIBO – what have they in common?

YOUR CHILD’S HEALTH,

&

THE GUT MICROBIOME –

Is there a link to your child’s recurring illness?

Above: Such a little cutie, I wonder who he belongs to?

THE GUT IS NOW  BEING LINKED VIA EVIDENCE TO A MYRIAD OF HEALTH CONDITIONS 

PROBIOTICS have being touted as the next best thing to heal all gut issues..but is that enough?

I say NO!

The microbiome of the gut is the most important part of the human body system as the nutrients that are delivered from the SMALL INTESTINE are a source of fuel for the blood stream. Guess what the bloodstream feeds.. every single organ, tissue, hormone and neurotransmitters receptor and cells.

If your Microbiome is dysbiotic it stands to reason that there may be areas that support the health of the gut may also support the overall health of the child.

So it stands to reason that if your child’s health is poor and they have been given antibiotics, even once, in their lifetime (and don’t get me wrong, antibiotics do play a huge place in our prolonged health today) then chances are the gut microbiome ( the bugs and microscopic flora living in the small intestine)  may be one option to consider in your child’s health and this may affect their behaviours, comprehension, nutrient absorption and immune health.

SIBO is a hidden and very under estimated infection of part of the SMALL INTESTINES and used to be called DYSBIOSIS. 

Chances are if your child has been diagnosied with SIBO they may have ongoing recurrent illnesses and ongoing antibiotic prescriptions until the gut is supported. Some studies have shown it takes years to retrain the flora in the gut to stay around. Probiotics require speciific and individualised prescription, not just a one size fits all as many blogs and health coaches tout.

This is why I want to take you on an online GUT GARDENING RETREAT.

I have created a webinar called “THE HEALTHY GUT DIET”  to teach you about various areas of your gut health and I really, really would love you to join me to help spread the news!

Watch the Webinar here!

 

I have added a professional article below that outlines research and studies into children hospitalized and the correlation of those with SIBO.

Yours in amazing health and light,

 

 

 

 

 

SIBO strongly linked to abdominal pain in children

Acknowledgement for article below:  Peterson, M.,  AdvDipHSc(Nat) GradCertEvBdPrac- Bioceuticals Practitioner Only Nutraceuticals.

Abdominal pain is one of the most common diagnoses in hospitalised children and the leading symptom in child and adolescent GIT diseases. It is also a common symptom of SIBO. Therefore, researchers looked at the prevalence of childhood abdominal pain and correlating SIBO. They found a high occurrence of SIBO in these children. To test whether SIBO was the cause of childhood abdominal pain, researchers performed hydrogen breath tests (HBTs) on 100 children aged from four to 17 years old (mean age was around seven to14), over five years. Although this test has limitations, with the ‘gold standard’ still being microbial analysis of the small intestinal fluid, it is the least invasive, and a commonly used test in the paediatric population. The results showed positive HBT results in 63% of the children presenting with abdominal pain. When looking at those under 10 years old, 46% had a SIBO positive result, with a similar result of 54% in those over 10 years old. There was a higher prevalence of SIBO in girls over the age of 10; however, this was nonsignificant (p=0.07). Overall, there were no significant gender differences.1 All patients with a positive HBT were treated with the antibiotic rifaximin (Xifaxan). This antibiotic is a commonly used SIBO treatment due to its low absorption capacity and relatively few side effects compared to other antibiotics.1

However, there are questions with its ability to maintain remission, as another study showed 44% of patients relapsed nine months after induction of remission with rifaximin.2 In this study 88% of those with a positive HBT achieved a normal HBT after antibiotic use.1 Childhood conditions can affect the normal homeostatic mechanisms restricting bacterial

In this study 88% of those with a positive HBT achieved a normal HBT after antibiotic use.1 Childhood conditions can affect the normal homeostatic mechanisms restricting bacterial

Childhood conditions can affect the normal homeostatic mechanisms restricting bacterial colonisation in the small intestine leading to SIBO, such as congenital or acquired anatomical abnormalities, diminished gastric acid secretion, congenital alteration of intestinal motility or other acquired chronic diseases. SIBO may even be an unrecognised cause of paediatric morbidity.3 This study demonstrates that SIBO is highly prevalent in childhood abdominal pain and should be considered as a cause that requires treatment. In a 2016 review, the authors noted that, “[o]wing to lack of established guidelines and few published interventional studies that assess the effectiveness of [SIBO] therapy, treatment of children with [SIBO] remains empiric and comprises antibiotic or probiotic therapy”.3

Reference:

1. Siniewicz-Luzeńczyk K, Bik-Gawin A, Zeman K, et al. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome in children. Prz Gastroenterol 2015;10(1):28-32. 2. Rezaie A, Pimentel M, Rao SS. How to test and treat small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: an evidence-based approach. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 2016;18(2):8. 3.

2. Rezaie A, Pimentel M, Rao SS. How to test and treat small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: an evidence-based approach. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 2016;18(2):8.

3. Sieczkowska A, Landowski P, Kaminska B, et al. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth in children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2016;62(2):196-207